Plunging into Depths: Demystifying Water Resistance in Watches

The term "water-resistant" is frequently found etched at the back of watches, indicating the ability of a watch to resist water penetration to a certain degree. But what does it truly signify? This post aims to demystify the concept of water resistance in watches.

The term “water-resistant” is frequently found etched at the back of watches, indicating the ability of a watch to resist water penetration to a certain degree. But what does it truly signify? This post aims to demystify the concept of water resistance in watches.

Understanding Water Resistance Ratings: Water resistance in watches is typically denoted in meters (m), atmospheres (ATM), or bars. It’s essential to note that the stated depth isn’t the actual depth a watch can be taken underwater. Instead, it represents the results of pressure tests conducted in labs, which involve conditions differing from actual swimming or diving scenarios.

  1. 30m/3ATM: This rating implies that the watch can withstand splashes of water, like rain or handwashing. It’s not suitable for swimming or showering. 💦
  2. 50m/5ATM: A watch with this rating can be worn for swimming in shallow depths. However, it’s not suitable for diving or snorkeling. 🏊‍♀️
  3. 100m/10ATM: Such a watch can be used for swimming, snorkeling, and other water sports, but it’s not suitable for scuba diving. 🏄‍♂️
  4. 200m/20ATM: A 200m rating means the watch is suitable for high-impact water sports and scuba diving. 🌊
  5. Diver’s 100m and Diver’s 200m+: These watches meet ISO standards for diving watches and are suitable for scuba diving at the indicated depths. They are equipped with extra features like a unidirectional bezel. 🦈

Maintaining Water Resistance: A watch’s water resistance isn’t a permanent attribute. Gaskets, seals, and other components can wear down over time, diminishing the watch’s water resistance. Regular servicing is crucial to keep these components in optimal condition.

Additionally, temperature fluctuations, such as moving from a cold environment to a hot one, can cause condensation inside the watch. So, it’s best to avoid extreme temperature changes.

Remember, the crown is a weak point for water ingress, so ensure it’s always fully pushed in or screwed down before getting the watch wet.

In conclusion, water resistance is an essential feature in many watches today, allowing us to go about our daily routines without worrying about damaging our timepiece. However, it’s important to understand what these ratings mean and how to maintain them, to ensure our watches stay ticking precisely and reliably, both on land and under the sea.

Share your love

Leave a Reply